More from the 2012 ACD Festival

Because enough is never quite enough, especially when it comes to great cars, here’s another photo gallery from the gathering of Auburns, Cords, and Duesenbergs in Auburn, Indiana this past weekend. 

 

As an event, the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Festival has been around long enough to become a cherished institution in the collector car world—and for some, a family tradition. In many clans, there are two and even three generations of gearheads who always know where they’ll be on Labor Day weekend: in Auburn.

As MCG reported in part one of its 2012 coverage, the ACD Festival includes an entire slate of activities. To learn more and start planning your visit in 2013 or beyond, you can consult the official ACD Festival website.

Meanwhile, enjoy these cars from the most recent gathering at Eckhart Park. Can you identify a personal favorite from among these classics? Is it one of the impeccably styled coffin-nose Cords? A sporty supercharged Auburn? A regal Duesenberg?

 

John Martin  Smith 1919 Auburn Beauty Six Touring
Terence Adderly 1931 Duesenberg J Murphy Beverly Berline Sedan
John Martin Smith 1919 Auburn Beauty SIx Touring
Sidemount mirror George Glaze 1930 Auburn Speedster
John Shell Duesenberg J Convertible Coupe
Peter Heydon 1927 Duesenberg X Boat Roadster LF
George Arakelian 1937 Cord 812 Cabriolet left front
Lee and Bonnie Gorsuch 1934 Auburn 652Y Phaeton
Anthony Ficco 1929 Duesenberg J-149 Dual Cowl Phaeton
1929 Cord L-29 Cabriolet
Lee Foldenauer 1937 Cord 812 Phaeton
Cord L-29 Convertible Coupe 204
George Arakelian 1937 Cord 812 Cabriolet rear
Duesenberg J radiator mascot aka Duesenbird
Anthony Ficco 1929 Duesenberg J-149 Dual Cowl Phaeton LF
1933 Auburn 101-A Coupe
Yellow Cord 810
Thomas Dudley 1936 Cord 810 Phaeton
Scott Davis 1936 Cord 810 Westchester right front
1929 Cord L-29 Sedan 232
Donald G. Wallace 1936 Auburn 852 Phaeton
Dan McAuliffe 1931 Auburn 898 Cabriolet
1937 Cord 812 Cabriolet 511
Bille Dreist Duesenberg 1929 J-237 All Weather Cabrioleet
Terry and Connie Peshia 1936 Cord Phaeton
John and Suzanne Baeke 1926 Duesenberg Model A Sedan

John Martin Smith 1919 Auburn Beauty Six Touring

Terence Adderly 1931 Duesenberg J Murphy Beverly Berline Sedan

John Martin Smith 1919 Auburn Beauty SIx Touring

Sidemount mirror George Glaze 1930 Auburn Speedster

John Shell Duesenberg J Convertible Coupe

Peter Heydon 1927 Duesenberg X Boat Roadster LF

George Arakelian 1937 Cord 812 Cabriolet left front

Lee and Bonnie Gorsuch 1934 Auburn 652Y Phaeton

Anthony Ficco 1929 Duesenberg J-149 Dual Cowl Phaeton

1929 Cord L-29 Cabriolet

Lee Foldenauer 1937 Cord 812 Phaeton

Cord L-29 Convertible Coupe 204

George Arakelian 1937 Cord 812 Cabriolet rear

Duesenberg J radiator mascot aka Duesenbird

Anthony Ficco 1929 Duesenberg J-149 Dual Cowl Phaeton LF

1933 Auburn 101-A Coupe

Yellow Cord 810

Thomas Dudley 1936 Cord 810 Phaeton

Scott Davis 1936 Cord 810 Westchester right front

1929 Cord L-29 Sedan 232

Donald G. Wallace 1936 Auburn 852 Phaeton

Dan McAuliffe 1931 Auburn 898 Cabriolet

1937 Cord 812 Cabriolet 511

Bille Dreist Duesenberg 1929 J-237 All Weather Cabrioleet

Terry and Connie Peshia 1936 Cord Phaeton

John and Suzanne Baeke 1926 Duesenberg Model A Sedan

 

 

3 thoughts on “More from the 2012 ACD Festival

  1. when i was 18 years old i took my girl friend for a spin in my employer`s Cord ,i missed the dashboard warning. “do not select 1st or reverse gear with the vehicle in motion.such is life. A far bigger disaster was when the local spiv spent a small fortune restoring the body work on a Cord and then sent it to the local auto electrician, is son took his girl friend for a spin, with dramatic consequences, the gearbox finished up in a million pieces spread over the road,the cheer that went up as we sat out side the country pub was deafening.

  2. I know that the Model J is the iconic model for a Duesenberg, but Peter Heydon’s X is truly fascinating and extremely rare. I believe only thirteen Model X Duesenbergs were ever made.

  3. I am surprised to hear there were that many. It’s completely understandable that the glory would go to the J, but these earlier models were engineering marvels.

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